Research spotlight:

Season's Eatings

‘Tis the season of plenty of food and drink.  While celebrating should be joyful, for some women, it’s not. All the holiday temptations can add another layer to an already complicated biological process.

It’s well known that women undergo hormonal changes every month due to the menstrual cycle. These changes can cause women to eat more, which is a natural, biological occurrence. 

However, Michigan State University Foundation Professor Kelly Klump has found that the increased food intake causes some women to become much more preoccupied with their body weight and shape. This intensified obsession can increase the risk of developing eating disorder symptoms.  


Kelly Klump, MSU Foundation Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University

Kelly Klump, MSU Foundation Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University

In the news:

MSU Professor Named to Renfrew Clinical Center Advisory Board

Kelly Klump, Michigan State University Foundation Professor of Psychology, has been named to the Clinical Advisory Board of The Renfrew Center, a nationally acclaimed eating disorder treatment facility. Read the full story.


What are eating disorders?

Eating disorders are extremely serious. They have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder and are associated with many medical problems and can lead to death.

Women with eating disorders suffer tremendously and deserve to have this on our national agenda with funding for continued research.
— Kelly Klump